ETC Press ETC Press is a publishing imprint with a twist. We publish books, but we’re also interested in the participatory future of content creation across multiple media. We are an academic, open source, multimedia, publishing imprint affiliated with the Entertainment Technology Center (ETC) at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and in partnership with Lulu.com. ETC Press has an affiliation with the Institute for the Future of the Book, sharing in the exploration of the evolution of discourse. ETC Press also has an agreement with the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) to place ETC Press publications in the ACM Digital Library, and another with Feedbooks to place ETC Press texts in their e-reading platform.
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Beyond Fun by Drew Davidson, et al.

ThoughtMeshThis book focuses on strategies for applying games, simulations and interactive experiences in learning contexts. A facet of this project is the interactive and collaborative method in which it was created. Instead of separated individual articles, <continued>

Cross-Media Communications by Drew Davidson, et al.

ThoughtMeshThis text is an introduction to the future of mass media and mass communications "" cross-media communications. Cross-media is explained through the presentation and analysis of contemporary examples and project-based tutorials in cross-media <continued>

Game Mods by Erik Champion, et al.

ThoughtMeshAre games worthy of academic attention? Can they be used effectively in the classroom, in the research laboratory, as an innovative design tool, as a persuasive political weapon? Game Mods: Design, Theory and Criticism aims to answer these and more <continued>

Ludoliteracy by José P. Zagal

ThoughtMeshIt seems like teaching about games should be easy. After all, students enjoy engaging with course content and have extensive experience with videogames. However, games education can be surprisingly complex. This book explores ludoliteracy, or the <continued>

Missions for Thoughtful Gamers by Andrew Cutting

ThoughtMeshWho am I? How do I live a good life? What is reality? Such perennial questions may seem remote from the pleasures of playing videogames for entertainment and fantasy. Yet gamers too, in the midst of having fun, are potentially embarked upon a quest <continued>

Mobile Media Learning by Bob Coulter, John Martin, Seann Dikkers, et al.

ThoughtMeshMobile Media Learning shares innovative uses of mobile technology for learning in a variety of settings. From camps to classrooms, parks to playgrounds, libraries to landmarks, Mobile Media Learning shows that exciting learning can happen anywhere <continued>

Real Time Research by Constance Steinkuehler, Eric Zimmerman, Kurt Squire, Seann Dikkers, et al.

ThoughtMeshReal-Time Research is a new kind of on-the-spot scholarship. At a series of conferences, the authors of this book asked academics, educators, and designers to collaborate on short-term, improvisational research projects - usually completed within 48 <continued>

stories in between by Drew Davidson

ThoughtMeshThis is a unique text exploring the interplay between stories and media. The discussion focuses around the Myst narrative as it moves across media from games to books to comics to games. Along the way, the text also discusses the Sandman comics, and <continued>

Tabletop by Drew Davidson, et al., Greg Costikyan

ThoughtMeshIn this volume, people of diverse backgrounds talk about tabletop games, game culture, and the intersection of games with learning, theater, and other forms. Some have chosen to write about their design process, others about games they admire, <continued>

The Cultural Gutter by Carol Borden, Chris Szego, Ian Driscoll, James Schellenberg, Jim Munroe

ThoughtMeshScience fiction, fantasy, comics, romance, genre movies, games all drain into the Cultural Gutter, a website dedicated to thoughtful articles about disreputable art—media and genres that are a little embarrassing. Irredeemable. Worthy of Note, <continued>

Toward a Ludic Architecture by Steffen P. Walz

ThoughtMeshWhether we think of a board game, an athletic competition in a stadium, a videogame, playful social networking on the World Wide Web, an Alternate Reality Game, a location-based mobile game, or any combination thereof: Ludic activities are, have, <continued>

Transmedia Storytelling by Max Giovagnoli

ThoughtMeshTelling stories simultaneously in multiple media is like creating a new "geography of the tale", and it requires the author and the audience to find new, interactive spaces for sharing in publishing projects for cinema, tv-series, advertising <continued>

Well Played 1.0 by Drew Davidson, et al.

ThoughtMeshWhat makes a game good? or bad? or better?Video games can be "well played" in two senses. On the one hand, well played is to games as well read is to books. On the other hand, well played as in well done.This book is full of in-depth close readings <continued>

Well Played 2.0 by Drew Davidson, et al.

ThoughtMeshFollowing on Well Played 1.0, this book is full of in-depth close readings of video games that parse out the various meanings to be found in the experience of playing a game. Contributors analyze sequences in a game in detail in order to illustrate <continued>

Well Played 3.0 by Drew Davidson, et al.

ThoughtMeshFollowing on Well Played 1.0 and 2.0, this book is full of in-depth close readings of video games that parse out the various meanings to be found in the experience of playing a game. Contributors analyze sequences in a game in detail in order to <continued>